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Marco Felluga Collio Pinot Grigio Mongris 2012

Bottle Size: 750ml Item #: 1840488
This item is not currently available for purchase.

Marco Felluga Collio Pinot Grigio Mongris 2012 750ml

Marco Felluga Collio Pinot Grigio Mongris

Golden yellow in color, often with copper tones. It has an intense and immediate bouquet with pronounced hints of acacia flowers, broom and apple. In the mouth it is elegantly fruity and becomes full bodied, well-structured and has a remarkably long finish.

Aromas of acacia flowers and apple mingle with juicy pear, minerals and a well-structured and long finish.

Following destemming, the fruit was macerated on its skins and fermented in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks, after which the wine aged sur lie for several months.

The name Mongris comes from the contraction of "mono variety” and the Friulano word for pinot grigio, Gris. Pinot Grigio arrived in Friuli Venezia Giulia over 150 years ago, and is now considered an indigenous grape. Today, it is one of the region’s most widely planted white grapes.

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This product is not currently available for purchase.
Marco Felluga Marco Felluga Collio Pinot Grigio Mongris 2012
BOTTLE SIZE: 750ml
Golden yellow in color, often with copper tones. It has an intense and immediate bouquet with pronounced hints of acacia flowers, broom and apple. In the mouth it is elegantly fruity and becomes full bodied, well-structured and has a remarkably long finish.
 

Notes on the Marco Felluga Collio Pinot Grigio Mongris 750ML 2012

Tasting Notes Aromas of acacia flowers and apple mingle with juicy pear, minerals and a well-structured and long finish.

Technical Notes Following destemming, the fruit was macerated on its skins and fermented in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks, after which the wine aged sur lie for several months.

Additional Notes The name Mongris comes from the contraction of "mono variety” and the Friulano word for pinot grigio, Gris. Pinot Grigio arrived in Friuli Venezia Giulia over 150 years ago, and is now considered an indigenous grape. Today, it is one of the region’s most widely planted white grapes.